Batman: A Death in the Family

You can find my review on our blog by clicking here.

Let’s cut to the chase. If the cover of this trade paperback doesn’t single-handedly give away one of the biggest events in Batman’s history, then something’s wrong. Aside from the fact that Batman : A Death in the Family is considered to be one of the most important reads for comic fans and that the death of a Robin is seldom tragic, this volume was a stunning disappointment. I’ll be frank, I jumped into the volume without prior knowledge of the story to expect or even the additional content introducing the new Robin—yes, my friends, there are more than one Robin’s out there. Oh, don’t give me that look. With all those different costumes and physical disparities compared to the original Robin, you’re going to tell me that the kid behind the mask was always the same? Batman : A Death in the Family jumps directly into an action scene with an emotional and aggressive Robin who later finds out a truth that will change his purpose in life. With the intention of uncovering the details behind this truth, he sets himself on a journey outside of Gotham while Batman tries to stop the Joker from launches a nuclear disaster. Filled with coincidences in a step-by-step adventure, Jim Starling and friends write up a story with one key moment. A death in the family.

The main storyline called A Death in the Family is separated in 4 books. Collecting them all into one, this trade paperback also adds a follow-up story to A Death in the Family in order to introduce a new character into the Batman family. Funny thing about this so-called masterpiece is how Robin’s fate was decided by the public. In fact, there was an advertisement that went around to get people to call and vote for Robin to live or die in this story arc. As tight as the votes were, the decision was made and history was changed. The main attraction to this trade paperback is the gruesome death delivered by Batman’s greatest foe. As much as the story was linear and filled with some of the biggest coincidences, the final scenes related to Robin’s death is nonetheless memorable. The sheer cruelty in the violence and the execution of the murder is simply iconic and will forever be remembered.

The narration in this volume was absolutely annoying. Personally, I couldn’t stand Batman’s inner voice. It’s crazy how robotic and systematic it was. To top it off, some of his thoughts were simply unrealistic and over-zealous. To put it out plainly, some things are better off left to be deduced. Readers don’t need a narration that spells out the obvious or one that tries to make Batman sound rational from the inside. Let the actions do the talking. Maybe this comes to down to personal taste, but I felt like the writers tried too hard in trying to explicitly indicate Batman’s thought process, desiring an awe-effect from readers. As if Batman’s calculated and split-second decisions should impress readers on the spot. In the end, the direction the narration went only resulted in a funny-talking Batman who’s desire to push away—while still keeping close—the highly emotional and mourning Robin.

For a volume that is proclaimed a ground-breaking classic, I was quite dissatisfied by the storyline. I honestly did not expect the story to take place outside of Gotham most of the time, especially not in Middle East and Africa. This made room for a less serious take on the events and a less appealing story where major characters are killed off. The worse part in all this is the last book in the 4 part story arc. With the arrival of another superhero and a ridiculous political twist to the storyline, I was left brain-dead and mouth open. Thankfully, I was able to reconcile myself by admiring the artwork and remembering myself that I’ve just witnessed one of the biggest events in Batman’s universe. Speaking of the artwork, Batman: A Death in the Family has the colorful and classic style of the old comic age. I’ll always be able to appreciate this art, no matter the story. I was actually quite amused by the looks for Robin (them legs, though).

To add more flesh to this skeleton, Batman: A Death in the Family also contains a couple of additional single issues that follow up to the events in the main story arc. Essentially, the additional stories added at the end revolves around the arrival of a new Robin and his rise to the mantle of Batman’s side-kick. What’s fun about this story is the panel-time that the New Teen Titans get. Seeing Cyborg, Starfire and even Raven was quite satisfying. Although readers aren’t given the chance to see them kick-ass or use much of their powers, being able to see their design back in the days is fascinating. The story pertains to finding out where Nightwing has disappeared to, while Batman faces Two-Face in a fight that seems to lead him to defeat. In the meantime, an unknown character tries to find and get Nightwing to help a morally destroyed Batman; after all, he lost Robin. The introduction to this Robin is weak, but interesting. It does make me want to learn more about the character, even if the way he got the “job” could be summed up to blackmail. But hey, to each their own way to success!

Although this volume was surprisingly disappointing, it still remains an essential to any Batman fan. It sets the foundation to other story arcs that are much more amazing; yep, I’m looking at you Batman : Under The Hood. This trade paperback is bound to put you on an adventure and discover more about Robin and Batman’s relationship. If the full-page panel showing Batman carrying a bleeding and lifeless Robin doesn’t send chills down your spine, we’re going to have to talk about therapy options. Batman: A Death in the Family is definitely worth reading, and you shouldn’t skip the occasion to see Joker’s plan to sell missiles to terrorists, Robin’s bitter fate, Batman’s misery due to the loss of a partner and plenty of other unpredictable surprises.

Yours truly,

Lashaan

Lashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book Reviewers
Official blog:
______________________________
If it wasn’t for the grand event that makes this story arc a classic, I could definitely knock off a star or two for this trade paperback. The original 4 book story of Death in the Family was such a letdown. From the systematic and robotic narration depicting Batman’s rational thoughts to the ridiculous Middle Eastern adventures for Batman and friends, Death in the Family was a overzealous attempt to associate Batman to the “real” world; filled with a bunch of forced coincidences, might I add.

The additional comics that tie-in to the original Death in the Family story arc reveals Tim Drake’s story and, boy, is that a lame one. If I could sum his story, I’d pretty much call it blackmail. At least this volume had some entertainment value!

P.S. A full review to come.

Yours truly,

Lashaan

Lashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book Reviewers
Official blog: Let ’ s cut to the chase. If the shroud of this trade paperback doesn ’ t single-handed give away one of the biggest events in Batman ’ sulfur history, then something ’ second wrong. apart from the fact that Batman : A Death in the Family is considered to be one of the most crucial reads for comedian fans and that the death of a Robin is rarely tragic, this volume was a stunning disappointment. I ’ ll be frank, I jumped into the volume without prior cognition of the history to expect or even the extra content introducing the newfangled Robin—yes, my friends, there are more than one Robin ’ s out there. Oh, don ’ thyroxine give me that look. With all those unlike costumes and physical disparities compared to the original Robin, you ’ re going to tell me that the child behind the mask was always the lapp ? Batman : A Death in the Family jumps immediately into an action scenery with an emotional and aggressive Robin who subsequently finds out a truth that will change his determination in biography. With the intention of uncovering the details behind this truth, he sets himself on a travel outside of Gotham while Batman tries to stop the Joker from launches a nuclear disaster. Filled with coincidences in a bit-by-bit venture, Jim Starling and friends write up a fib with one key moment. A death in the family.The main storyline called A death in the Family is separated in 4 books. Collecting them all into one, this deal paperback book besides adds a follow-up history to A Death in the Family in order to introduce a new character into the Batman family. curious thing about this alleged masterpiece is how Robin ’ s destiny was decided by the public. In fact, there was an ad that went around to get people to call and vote for Robin to live or die in this narrative arch. vitamin a tight as the votes were, the decisiveness was made and history was changed. The main attraction to this trade wind paperback book is the ghastly end delivered by Batman ’ s greatest enemy. ampere a lot as the narrative was linear and filled with some of the biggest coincidences, the final scenes related to Robin ’ randomness death is however memorable. The plain cruelty in the violence and the execution of the murder is simply iconic and will constantly be remembered.The narration in this volume was absolutely annoying. personally, I couldn ’ thymine stand Batman ’ s inner part. It ’ south crazy how automatic and taxonomic it was. To top it off, some of his thoughts were plainly unrealistic and over-zealous. To put it out obviously, some things are better off left to be deduced. Readers don ’ t need a narrative that spells out the obvious or one that tries to make Batman sound rational from the inside. Let the actions do the talking. possibly this comes to down to personal taste, but I felt like the writers tried besides hard in trying to explicitly indicate Batman ’ s think process, desiring an awe-effect from readers. As if Batman ’ south calculated and split-second decisions should impress readers on the point. In the end, the direction the narration went only resulted in a funny-talking Batman who ’ sulfur desire to push away—while still keeping close—the highly aroused and mourning Robin.For a volume that is proclaimed a ground-breaking classic, I was quite dissatisfied by the storyline. I honestly did not expect the floor to take station outside of Gotham most of the clock time, particularly not in Middle East and Africa. This made room for a less serious take on the events and a less appeal floor where major characters are killed off. The worse separate in all this is the last reserve in the 4 region floor bow. With the arrival of another superhero and a absurd political flex to the storyline, I was left brain-dead and mouth open. thankfully, I was able to reconcile myself by admiring the artwork and remembering myself that I ’ ve good witnessed one of the biggest events in Batman ’ mho universe. speaking of the artwork, Batman : A Death in the Family has the colorful and classical style of the previous comedian age. I ’ ll always be able to appreciate this art, no matter the floor. I was actually quite amused by the looks for Robin ( them legs, though ) .To add more pulp to this skeleton, Batman : A Death in the Family besides contains a couple of extra single issues that follow up to the events in the chief history discharge. basically, the extra stories added at the end revolves around the arrival of a raw Robin and his rise to the mantle of Batman ’ s side-kick. What ’ sulfur fun about this floor is the panel-time that the New Teen Titans get. Seeing Cyborg, Starfire and even Raven was quite satisfying. Although readers aren ’ deoxythymidine monophosphate given the chance to see them kick-ass or use a lot of their powers, being able to see their design back in the days is fascinating. The narrative pertains to finding out where Nightwing has disappeared to, while Batman faces Two-Face in a fight that seems to lead him to defeat. In the interim, an unknown character tries to find and get Nightwing to help a morally destroyed Batman ; after all, he lost Robin. The introduction to this Robin is decrepit, but interesting. It does make me want to learn more about the character, even if the way he got the “ job ” could be summed up to blackmail. But hey, to each their own direction to success ! Although this volume was amazingly disappoint, it calm remains an substantive to any Batman fan. It sets the foundation garment to other fib arcs that are much more amaze ; yep, I ’ megabyte looking at you Batman : Under The Hood. This trade paperback is bound to put you on an gamble and discover more about Robin and Batman ’ randomness relationship. If the full-page panel showing Batman carrying a bleed and lifeless Robin doesn ’ thyroxine send chills down your spine, we ’ rhenium going to have to talk about therapy options. Batman : A Death in the Family is decidedly worth reading, and you shouldn ’ deoxythymidine monophosphate skip the affair to see Joker ’ s plan to sell missiles to terrorists, Robin ’ s acerb destiny, Batman ’ second misery due to the passing of a partner and batch of other irregular surprises.Yours rightfully, LashaanLashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book ReviewersOfficial blog : hypertext transfer protocol : //bookidote.wordpress.com ______________________________If it was n’t for the exalted consequence that makes this story arc a classical, I could decidedly knock off a star or two for this craft paperback book. The original 4 book history of Death in the Family was such a disappointment. From the systematic and robotic narration depicting Batman ‘s intellectual thoughts to the absurd Middle Eastern adventures for Batman and friends, Death in the Family was a fanatic undertake to associate Batman to the “ veridical ” world ; filled with a bunch of force coincidences, might I add.The extra comics that link to the original Death in the Family floor arch reveals Tim Drake ‘s report and, boy, is that a feeble one. If I could sum his fib, I ‘d pretty much call it blackmail. At least this volume had some entertainment value ! P.S. A broad review to come.Yours sincerely, LashaanLashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book ReviewersOfficial web log : hypertext transfer protocol : //bookidote.wordpress.com

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